Childrens Books

Our Children’s Book Campaign

MERGE believes that all boys – and all children – are born loving, caring and sensitive. We believe children learn about gender from many sources including books, media, teachers, and family.  And, we believe children are often limited and harmed by gender norms and stereotypes. Books in this campaign are selected to help children and adults learn about and appreciate gender equality, together.

Recommended uses of books in our children’s campaign:

  • Read and discuss with a child
  • Gift to a family with young children
  • Gift to a classroom, children’s program or library

 

Campaign Goals

  • To advance the MERGE mission by promoting literacy and adult-child connection through children’s books which highlight themes of positive masculinity and gender equality
  • Increase literacy and adult-child connection through reading and discussion
  • Expand partnerships with early childhood serving programs and agencies

 

Book Campaign Timeline

  • June 2017: Campaign launch
  • Summer 2017:  Form Advisory Committee of childhood practitioners and educators from throughout MA and CT
  • Fall 2017: Identify book selection criteria and engagement strategies
  • Present – June 2018: Highlight 4-6 books in the campaign
  • Present – June 2018: Distribute books at MERGE events and to participating partners
  • 2018: Capture and share ‘Stories of Impact’

Current Book Highlight:

Made by Raffi bookMade by Raffi
by Craig Pomranz & Margaret Chamberlain

“I am delighted that Made by Raffi has been selected as the first book for the MERGE for Equality Children’s Book Campaign.  I was inspired to write this book by the experience of my godson, who felt “different” because he didn’t love sports and liked to sew and knit – one day he asked his mother if there is such a thing as a tomgirl.   His question reminds us of how society creates labels and boundaries.  How much misery and wasted talent is caused by these outdated notions of gender norms and stereotypes?

I hoped to share a message of inclusiveness and creativity as well as offer the notion that everyone has limitless opportunities to try on different identities.  I have been deeply gratified that the book, which has been translated into eight languages in 11 countries, has resonated across many cultures.

Thank you, MERGE for Equality, for keeping the conversation going and for the work you do to open minds and improve the world!       —Craig Pomranz, author

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When the script for ‘Raffi’ arrived in my studio, I had no idea what a future stir it would cause among parents and educationalists. I felt very comfortable with the concept and didn't really appreciate that it was unusual. You see I am an artist, like Raffi, and although I am female, I had similar experiences when I was at school and growing up. I loved the fact that he fell in love with knitting at an early age, as I did too!

Unexpectedly though in the UK in the 1950s, boys and girls learned to knit at school and my brother was good at it, and it wasn't considered strange.However, I realise that today it has become unusual, and girls and boys - and their interests - have been divided up from babyhood. I do hope this book helps to make it ok for everyone to be creative and that it is equally acceptable to be un-sporty and un-competitive and prefer to be quiet and introverted.     —Margaret Chamberlain, illustrator

Discussion Prompts for Made by Raffi

1.      What ideas did Raffi struggle with in the beginning of the story?

2.      How did the adults in the story support Raffi?

3.      What helped the children change their behavior toward Raffi?

4.      How do you think Raffi felt at the end of the story?

5.      How might this story be helpful for your friends and family?